Blog Posts Archive by Month: October, 2018

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Witness in Palestine: Trump Recognizes of Jerusalem as Israel’s Capital

From the

by Julia Ganson

The first impact of the announcement on me directly happened even before it was officially made on December 7. The US Consulate in Jerusalem that monitors the safety of US citizens in the West Bank contacted me 24 hours beforehand and directed me to stay away from the campus where I work, warning that “Birzeit University students are known to be highly politicized.” The consulate officer told me to cancel my appointments the next afternoon in Ramallah, and ideally to stay home for at least the next few days.

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SPC in Action

From the

Various authors

SPC Birthday Dinner in March

SPC’s annual birthday dinner will be held in late March (date TBA) and will feature black lesbian feminist activist, author and former Albany city councilor, Barbara Smith.

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Change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Syracuse and Onondaga County.

From the

by Annie Windholz

Last October, Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation (NOON) launched a campaign to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Syracuse and Onondaga County.

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Getting Beyond War and Militarism: The “To-Do” List

From the

by Ed Kinane

Violence begets violence. War profits only the few, the rich, the powerful—the 1%. As moral beings and tax paying citizens we must vigorously oppose war. Especially those wars of aggression perpetrated by the US and its allies and proxies.

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Learning from and Remembering Chief Irving Powless Jr.

From the

In gratitude to Chief Irving Powless Jr.

Chief Irving Powless Jr. passed away on December 1, 2017. He was a member of the Onondaga Nation Council of Chiefs, an expert on traditional law, history and treaties. Irv was also Navy veteran, a long-time railroad worker, an author, a Hall of Fame lacrosse player, father, husband, and story teller with a powerful message.

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Overcoming Race and Class Divides

From the

By Barbara Smith

I was asked to speak about identity politics and the history of the Combahee River Collective. I’m also going to discuss where the concept of intersectionality actually came from, because most people do not know that.

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Overcoming Race and Class Divides

From the

By Barbara Smith

I was asked to speak about identity politics and the history of the Combahee River Collective. I’m also going to discuss where the concept of intersectionality actually came from, because most people do not know that.

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Overcoming Race and Class Divides

From the

By Barbara Smith

I was asked to speak about identity politics and the history of the Combahee River Collective. I’m also going to discuss where the concept of intersectionality actually came from, because most people do not know that.

Newsletter

Overcoming Race and Class Divides

From the

By Barbara Smith

I was asked to speak about identity politics and the history of the Combahee River Collective. I’m also going to discuss where the concept of intersectionality actually came from, because most people do not know that.

Newsletter

Race and the War on Terror

From the

By Aly Wane

I still remember watching the Twin Towers fall on 9/11. Emotionally, I was gutted. All I could think about was the tremendous amount of suffering and grief that the victims’ family members would endure for the rest of their lives. I participated in the grief of the country as well. But intellectually I also knew that my life as a Black immigrant was about to change for the worse. I knew that this country’s imperialist foreign policy was going to turn more murderous and that the recipients of that international violence would mostly be Black and Brown bodies.

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